Tag Archives: scripture

5 Ideas for Sabbath Rest

My Sundays aren’t always restful. Often, the only thing distinct about Sunday is the extra work of getting the family out the door to church, calming a fussy baby who is missing her nap, and then frantically trying to serve some lunch before anyone turns into a grumpy, overly-hungry pile of goo.

Can anyone else relate to this?

So, what is Sunday supposed to look like for a Christian? Should it be a Sabbath day of rest, like is described in the Old Testament? Should I do no work? Or is it just the same as any other day and Christians should treat their whole week the same way?

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Waiting on God’s Timing


31 Then the Lord said to Moses, 2 “See, I have chosen Bezalel son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, 3 and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with wisdom, with understanding, with knowledge and with all kinds of skills— 4 to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, 5 to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of crafts. 6 Moreover, I have appointed Oholiab son of Ahisamak, of the tribe of Dan, to help him. Also I have given ability to all the skilled workers to make everything I have commanded you: 7 the tent of meeting, the ark of the covenant law with the atonement cover on it, and all the other furnishings of the tent— 8 the table and its articles, the pure gold lampstand and all its accessories, the altar of incense, 9 the altar of burnt offering and all its utensils, the basin with its stand— 10 and also the woven garments, both the sacred garments for Aaron the priest and the garments for his sons when they serve as priests, 11 and the anointing oil and fragrant incense for the Holy Place. They are to make them just as I commanded you.”



32 When the people saw that Moses was so long in coming down from the mountain, they gathered around Aaron and said, “Come, make us gods who will go before us. As for this fellow Moses who brought us up out of Egypt, we don’t know what has happened to him.”


2 Aaron answered them, “Take off the gold earrings that your wives, your sons and your daughters are wearing, and bring them to me.” 3 So all the people took off their earrings and brought them to Aaron. 4 He took what they handed him and made it into an idol cast in the shape of a calf, fashioning it with a tool. Then they said, “These are your gods, Israel, who brought you up out of Egypt.”

5 When Aaron saw this, he built an altar in front of the calf and announced, “Tomorrow there will be a festival to the Lord.” 6 So the next day the people rose early and sacrificed burnt offerings and presented fellowship offerings. Afterward they sat down to eat and drink and got up to indulge in revelry.

(Exodus 31:1-11, 32:1-6)

Learning from the Israelites reaction to waiting for Moses to return from Mount Sinai in Exodus, we're reminded that God can and will provide a way for us to glorify Him, but we must trust and wait sometimes. (Christian motherhood, marriage, life)

Reading through Exodus, particularly these passages, I’ve been struck by God’s foresight and creativity, as well as the common inclination of God’s people to grow impatient and insecure while waiting on God’s timing. Continue reading

The God Who Sees

This year, I’m working through a “read the Bible in a year” plan. I joined up with a group of family, friends, and acquaintances on Facebook and together we are reading the Bible in chronological order, rather than the typical canonical order of the books in the Bible. I’d love to share some of my thoughts with you as I work my way through the story of God in Scripture! Here are some reflections on Genesis 16:7-15 and 29:16-35 (see below the post for these readings).

I am intrigued by the accounts of Hagar and Leah, especially in what these stories communicate about God. For both, they note that God "sees" them.

I am intrigued by the accounts of Hagar and Leah, especially in what their stories communicate about God. Continue reading

Bringing a Child into this World

With the birth of my first child, the heaviness of God’s sorrow over the sin and brokenness of our world came sharply into focus for me.

There was only a faint light through the window of the dark nursery, but I could still clearly see each tiny curve and chubby wrinkle of my infant daughter’s hand. I gently rocked back and forth as I held her warm little body against my chest. But, as I sat there—the perfect image of maternal contentment—I was overwhelmed by a recognition of the tender fragility of life and the tremendous magnitude of evil.

I was delighted with my daughter, and marveled at every little wonderful thing about her, but the beauty and wonder and joy and glories of life stood in heart wrenching contrast to how far short our world falls from God’s good plan. Continue reading